Featured artists

After what started out as a peaceful hobby, Claybord artist Jim Musil has found much success sharing his paintings on social media.

Amado Peña's art celebrates the strength of a people who meet the harsh realities of life in an uncompromising land and his work is a tribute to the Native Americans who survive by living in harmony with an adversarial, untamed environment. Amado’s artwork is defined by its bold color and form and dynamic composition.

Chicago Claybord artist, Louise LeBourgeois, describes how her love of swimming in Lake Michigan carries over into her oil paintings.

Sally Maxwell has been working with scratchboard for over fifty-three years and has helped to define it as a fine art medium. Finding inspiration in animals and her own colorful garden; each piece is a snapshot of the intensity that nature can possess in its quiet moments.

Caroline Adams, an egg tempera artist, discovered Claybord for her abstract landscape artwork. Inspired by the many places she has lived, her work draws from the colors, shapes, and lines of each place.

Sarasota, Florida-based Claybord artist, Alexis Fraser, is otherwise known in the art scene as "Lipstick Lex". With an emphasis on promoting love, self-love, beauty, personal empowerment, and creative inspiration through her subjects, Lex's innovative method delivers chic and conversational art that is equally vibrant as it is unique.

We caught up with Beverly, MA artist Andrew Houle, who uses oil on Ampersand Claybord, for a Q&A session. Houle, recognizing influences from Hopper and Rockwell, has worked towards creating a personal narrative through his paintings connecting the viewer to his or her community.

Gordon Corrins' incredible wildlife artwork depict portraits of a wide range of animals, but his dynamic style and strong contrast of light and shadow is what brings them to life.

Louise LeBourgeois paints waterscapes like no one else, on Claybord, with oil. The water brings her back to the places she found magical as a child, and the paintings she creates are pure magic made from pigments, oil, and Claybord. Very few oil painters gravitate towards Claybord, but for Louise, nothing compares.

Andrea describes herself as an illuminator of surfaces, creating organic, drawing based abstractions. Even though she uses a simplistic subject matter and color palette, the ideas and spaces are complex and deep.

From a very early age, Jeanne Rhea thought of herself as an artist. And yet, as many do, she hesitated to call herself one. “Others should make that determination… my art should speak for itself.” It was only within the last ten years that she has felt comfortable assuming the title.