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All Things Ampersand

Painting on Panel: Resources for Hardbord

In our “Painting on Panels” series, I’ve been sharing a lot of tips on working on wood panels.  To keep it all in one place, this is a list of resources for understanding wood panels and the best practices in working on them for producing long lasting art.

Working with Masonite — Read about what makes Ampersand’s hardboard different than Masonite, archival to use and the differences between other panels in the market.


Solid Wood vs. Manufactured Wood Panels —  The top 4 things an artist should consider when choosing a panel type.


Differences between HDF & MDF — What to look for in choosing a panel, whether it is hardboard, HDF or MDF.  Understanding the properties of each and how they will effect your artwork long term.


Cradling and Supports — Why it’s a good idea to brace large manufactured panels.


Sizing — Why it is important to size panels before priming and how to choose the proper products for good adhesion.


Oil Priming — All raw wood panels need to be sized and primed before painting. This outlines the basics on priming with an oil ground and which products to use for the best results.  


Acrylic Priming —  Step by step instructions for using an acrylic dispersion groung to prepare wood panels.

Support Induced Discoloration —  The reasons that SID occurs and what you can do to prevent it.  

Take note that Hardbord and Unprimed Basswood are on sale now up to 50% off list price through the end of February.  Here is a list of the participating dealers: www.ampersandart.com/retailers2/promo-retail

All things Ampersand, 

Karyn Meyer-Berthel 
Artist & Social Media Specialist 
Ampersand Art Supply 

Click here to explore the full selection of Ampersand panels and tools.

Painting on Panel: Support Induced Discoloration

You may have heard the term “Support Induced Discoloration” or SID in relation to sealing panels or even gessoing a canvas.  And SID is the one reason that Ampersand encourages sealing panels before priming, but what does it really mean and how does it effect art long term?

Support Induced Discoloration is a relatively new concept to the art world, new because acrylic dispersion paints are new.  Support Induced Discoloration occurs when acrylic paints change color due to pulling up toxins or residue in the substrate.  The fluids in the paint leach into the substrate, through the primer and pull up the residue, leaving behind particulate in the paint that discolors it.  This is most apparent in transparent gels and mediums but also occurs to pigmented paint.  Gesso or primer is not sufficient in preventing discoloration, so sealing or sizing is always recommended.  

You can prevent SID from affecting your own work by properly sealing wood panels before use.  For more information on Sealing (or sizing) panels, refer to our previous post:
Painting on panel sizing.  OR, You can purchase one of Ampersand’s already sealed and primed panels, such as Gessobord™, Encausticbord™, Claybord™, Aquabord™ or Scratchbord™.  All of these panels have been sealed with Ampersand’s Archiva-Seal™ technology.

In the early 1990’s, Golden Artist Colors did some significant research with Buffalo State College to discover support induced discoloration and test the degrees of discoloration on different supports, with different acrylic mediums and primers.  The results from these experiments led to what we know today about SID.  

“SID contamination often goes undetected. In most cases, the paints applied contain a sufficient level of pigment, thus a strong enough color, to conceal the yellowing. However, in a transparent glaze and especially in thick translucent gel layers, SID becomes quite noticeable. SID can transform the appearance of an Ultramarine Blue glaze into a lower chroma, greenish color. Gesso alone will not stop SID, and different gels and mediums have varying degrees of blocking capabilities. The best product Golden Artist Colors produces to prevent SID is GAC 100. This thin medium works best when 2 or more coats are applied directly into the support. Once dry, the canvas can then be primed and subsequently painted with less potential for discoloration. Pre-primed canvases can be sealed with GAC 100 as well. Apply one or two coats onto the surface, and follow with at least one coat of gesso to regain tooth if needed.” — From the GAC website

Golden has neatly packaged the effects of SID on a masonite panel below in video format.  You can see for yourself in a few minutes how drastically a piece of art can change in a matter of weeks if the work is not sealed properly.


All things Ampersand, 
Karyn Meyer-Berthel 
Artist & Social Media Specialist 
Ampersand Art Supply 

Click here to explore the full selection of Ampersand panels and tools.

Painting on Panel: Sizing

All wood panels must be sized, or sealed, before painting to contain the natural chemicals within the wood that can break a painting down over time. Support Induced Discoloration (SID) occurs when a panel is not properly prepared and these chemicals leach through to the paint on the surface. By choosing a denser panel with a low acid content, an artist greatly reduces their risk of SID. However, all wood panels should be sized (sealed) and primed before painting to ensure their longevity.
Traditionally, panels were sized (sealed) with hide skin glue before applying the Gesso grounds. However, current research has shown that hide glues like rabbit skin glue do not completely seal the surface, and deteriorate over time. Conservators consider a PVA size or acrylic resin a superior modern substitute for hide skin glue. If you are sealing your own panel such as Ampersand’s Hardbord™, we recommend using GAC100 from Golden®. This is a superior sealer for panels. Its high resin content seals the panel very well and forms a good film on the surface. GAC100 also forms a good foundation for proper adhesion to layers of gesso. With Ampersand’s coated surfaces such as Claybord and Gessobord, Ampersand uses their Archiva-Seal technology to seal their panels prior to applying their painting grounds. This technology employs a specialized method to apply their proprietary sealers so that the actual fibers of the board are sealed. This sealing process creates a barrier between Ampersand’s acid-free coatings and the hardboard surface, ensuring that an artists’ work will be protected over time.
Prior to sealing, make sure your panel is clean of any dust or debris. Some experts recommend that you slightly sand the surface of the panel to ensure good adhesion. Note that Ampersand Hardbord should not be sanded. Removing the top layer of tempered fibers can cause the panel to warp when gesso is applied. Next, apply GAC100 liberally with a brush onto the panel. Take a putty knife or spatula and work the GAC100 into the fibers of the panel while it is still wet. Smooth it out and let this first layer dry. Next, apply two additional coatings with a brush, letting each layer dry in between coatings (no need to sand between layers). Make sure that the sealer is evenly distributed throughout the surface. It is highly recommended that you seal both sides of the panel to retard moisture penetration on the front and back and to equalize both sides of the panel to prevent warping.

All things Ampersand, 
Karyn Meyer-Berthel 
Artist & Social Media Specialist 
Ampersand Art Supply 

Click here to explore the full selection of Ampersand panels and tools.